A History of Scottish Highland Dancing

A History of Scottish Highland Dancing

The origins of Highland dancing like most of our Scottish traditions are swathed in the mists of time. Our proud history and traditions were orally told and passed through the generations.   It is said that the old kings and clan chiefs would hold Highland games as a means to select the best men at […]

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The Voyage of the Hector

The Voyage of the Hector

It was only 28 years after the infamous Battle of Culloden, in 1773, when the Hector was moored within Loch Broom taking onboard a group of people from the Highlands. 189 passengers joined the Hector that day, 25 single men, 33 families, a piper and their agent, all of which had one thing in common. They […]

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A Victorian View Into Scottish North America: Part Two Of Lady Isabella Bird’s Encounters With Scots In Canada And America

A Victorian View Into Scottish North America: Part Two Of Lady Isabella Bird’s Encounters With Scots In Canada And America

A few weeks ago, we took a peek into the late nineteenth-century world of frontier Colorado with a most remarkable little Victorian era explorer named Lady Isabella Bird.  On one of her many adventurous journeys around the globe, Englishwoman Lady Isabella introduced us to the Chalmers family in the foothills of the front range in […]

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Boots and Roots: A Meditation

Boots and Roots: A Meditation

Before Christmas just passed there were various threads on Scottish Clans and Families about rights to the title ‘Scot’ or ‘Scottish’.  Far from a relatively minor Facebook debate, there was an issue at stake – how we Scots (if I may be so bold) regard our diaspora cousins. Amanda (who is English, by the way) […]

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Behind the Anglo Norman Veil: A holiday message about Gaelic vernacular economics

Behind the Anglo Norman Veil: A holiday message about Gaelic vernacular economics

One of the things that discourages individuals from recognizing and exploring, not to mention enjoying, their Scottish Gaelic heritage is the widespread view that the only distinct aspect of Gaelic culture was, and is, its Celtic language. Many people consciously and unconsciously are assured that beyond “Ceud Mile Failte” and “Slainte”, Gaelic culture is basically little […]

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Meet The Chalmers: Lady Isabella Bird finds Scottish Covenanters in the 1873 Colorado Territory

Meet The Chalmers: Lady Isabella Bird finds Scottish Covenanters in the 1873 Colorado Territory

In 1873, an astoundingly plucky young woman made it her strong desire to visit a primitive Rocky Mountain supply outpost in the valley of the Big Thompson river. The place was called Estes Park and it had only recently sprouted up from pure wilderness in Colorado Territory’s northern mountains (Colorado would not enter the union as a state for another three years). Constantly […]

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Murdo Mackenzie: The most influential cattleman in America was from Scotland

Murdo Mackenzie: The most influential cattleman in America was from Scotland

Any cattleman worth his salt will tell you that he’s in the grass business. He either grows it himself or takes his cows where it grows up naturally. That means that it is not so much the cow that deserves attention. The important thing is the land and the water – when water is available, […]

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Getting comfortable with Gaelic’s indigenous side – a few things to consider

Getting comfortable with Gaelic’s indigenous side – a few things to consider

Some of the advantages that accompany engagement with one’s Gaelic heritage are the wonderful and useful bits of relevance that a Gaelic past brings to modern life. That’s right. Lessons learned from a Gaelic perspective can be productively relevant to difficult problems we face today. Consider the following: Gaelic tradition introduces community oriented and inclusive perspective in an increasingly exclusive and inward looking […]

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