A brief history of tartan in Scotland

A brief history of tartan in Scotland

Tartan is one of the most distinctive and recognisable textile in the western world and Scotland has become one with it. The earliest reports we see about tartan come from the Roman writers Virgil and Tacitus who wrote that the picts/celts were wearing striped, sometimes across, cloaks, shiny and bright.   Tacitus also says they were […]

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The Battle of Baugé

The Battle of Baugé

Throughout Scottish history there have been many battles fought on Scots soil, many have been fought on English soil, however a few battles between Scotland and England have taken place on French soil. Few have been as important as this one though; the Battle of Baugé Background: The Battle was part of the ‘Hundred Years War’ […]

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You and Whose Army? The Story of the Atholl Highlanders

You and Whose Army? The Story of the Atholl Highlanders

In the fraternity of the super wealthy there are many very expensive indulgences that help proclaim the owner’s status; The massive yacht, the exotic cliff top villa, maybe a private jet? However no matter how far up the fortune 500 rankings you go the Duke of Atholl has something that beats every oligarch hands down. […]

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The Earl Haig – A Study in Controversy

The Earl Haig – A Study in Controversy

Field Marshal, the Earl Haig was born in Edinburgh’s Charlotte Square in 1861 and would gain fame and noteriety as the Supreme Commander of the British Forces during the First World War. Haig replaced Sir John French in 1916 as the conflict deteriorated into a war of attrition. At this time, the French were under severe pressure at the Battle of Verdun, so Haig launched the Somme offensive to drive back the German army. The battle lasted a little over 4 months, by which time the casualty figures had exceeded a million. Little gain was made, and Haig and his generals were blamed in many quarters for their ineptitude, and Haig himself became known as the Butcher of the Somme. A year later at the Battle of Passchendaele, huge losses for little success was repeated, but both battles had severely damaged the German army and their resilliance. In November 1918 Haig made the final breakthrough and effectively won the war.

Following the war, Sir Douglas Haig was promoted to the peerage as the Earl Haig; he was then instrumental in setting up the British Legion and the Poppy Appeal – two institutions with the purpose of raising funds and providing help and welfare for soldiers and their families, which is very much the legacy of this most controversial of Scotsmen.

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