The Annat Skull

The Annat Skull

The Annat Skull

There’s a superstition in Applecross/Torridon area of Scotland that relates to the Annat skull in which water sipped from the skull of a female suicide is a supposed cure for epilepsy. The poor woman (C. M. Robertson) is thought to have been the daughter in law of the Garve Wizzard who is said to have lured passersby to their death in the Black Water river in order that he might steal their possessions. The skull became a controversial subject in 1900 when it was alleged to still be in use in Torridon. The Rev. Duncan Dewar, a minister of 24 years standing, felt compelled to respond publicaly that ‘no such’ skull ever existed in the parish of Applecross’. Dewar may be correct in limiting his observation to his own parish but Rev. Kenneth MacDonald, of the Free Church around the same time, attests to it’s use in Torridon.

Adapted from “Applecross and it’s Hinterland  – A Historical Miscellany” by Iain MacLennan


About Amanda Moffet

I run with Rodger Moffet. Live in Edinburgh and love travelling around Scotland gathering stories.

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